Theory

4 July 2011

“OK … it might be lovely … but it’s really not us!”

What’s the most deeply-felt complaint from internal stakeholders about their intranet? To get to the real answer to this question, you have to be quite persistent.

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Posted by: Anna Gilson

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1 October 2010

Will Flash usage survive the jQuery challenge?

It’s been around since 1996 and over 95% of us have it on our desktops and laptops, but opinions are as polarized as ever on Flash.

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Posted by: Colin Farrow

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Practice

What’s the most deeply-felt complaint from internal stakeholders about their intranet? To get to the real answer to this question, you have to be quite persistent. Users will tell you that it’s too slow. It’s old-fashioned. It’s difficult to find things. And it usually is all of these things.

Now … it would be easy to take these answers at face value and address them in an ‘intranet re-vamp’ project that will deliver a better intranet; an intranet more fit for purpose.

But if we dig deeper, there’s often something else lurking below the surface. Something that many users will struggle to put into words. Something that may seem almost too trivial to mention, but that stops them identifying with their intranet.
That thing is … however good or bad you may think their intranet is, it’s just not them!

We heard these voices recently when we were re-designing an intranet for a global confectionary brand. What the users were saying to us is that none of their deeply held brand values of commitment, innovation and fun were coming through in the intranet experience.
The moral of the story? It’s time to stop seeing intranets merely as spaces where staff go to find and share information. It’s time to see them as venues where people choose to meet and work together (and sometimes find and share information).

More case studies

Theory

4 July 2011

“OK … it might be lovely … but it’s really not us!”

What’s the most deeply-felt complaint from internal stakeholders about their intranet? To get to the real answer to this question, you have to be quite persistent.

Read more

Posted by: Anna Gilson

Comments: No comments

1 October 2010

Will Flash usage survive the jQuery challenge?

It’s been around since 1996 and over 95% of us have it on our desktops and laptops, but opinions are as polarized as ever on Flash.

Read more

Posted by: Colin Farrow

Comments: No comments

Practice

It’s been around since 1996 and over 95% of us have it on our desktops and laptops, but opinions are as polarized as ever on Flash.

In the corporate communications world, web design is becoming more stripped back all the time as designers and their clients appreciate that usability is far more important than the way things look, feel, move and sound. It’s nice to have it all, but if you could choose just one thing you’d go for usability every time.

So … why would you want to incorporate something that’s slow to load, difficult to optimise for search engines and delivers uneven accessibility? The answer has to be engagement – creating a branded piece of digital experience that adds sufficient value to justify the compromise.

OK, we’re hanging on in there, but then jQuery comes along, offering to do much of what Flash does but with speed and accessibility. So now, if you want to create a funky image selection you can do it without Flash – http://demo.marcofolio.net/polaroid_photo_viewer/ (dig the sunglasses!) – or if it’s an image carousel you’re after – http://demo.marcofolio.net/polaroid_photo_viewer/ – jQuery will create some nice transitions for you. While it doesn’t have the 3D capabilities of Flash, there is subtlety of screen refresh in this switch display example – http://www.sohtanaka.com/web-design/examples/display-switch/

And then we hear that iPad doesn’t support Flash … and then there’s HTML5’s video capabilities … Oh dear. Adobe must be feeling the chill winds.

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Call Anna Gilson on
07590 033422 or email anna@akgconsulting.co.uk